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Courses

PLEASE NOTE: Courses listed as Required, Core, Elective, or Practicum are approved to fulfill the designated requirement of the Program in Entrepreneurship. Courses listed as "Courses of Interest" have not been approved to count toward the Program in Entrepreneurship (PIE).

 

Required

  • Credits:
    1
    Grading:
    Pass/Fail
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This seminar series is designed to expose students to entrepreneurship through interaction with experienced entrepreneurs, business leaders, and venture capitalists as well as individuals involved in emerging business models, new venture creation, and technology commercialization. While covering a broad set of engineering disciplines, guest speakers will share their knowledge on the latest, most diverse practices on legal, financial, and other innovation issues. The lectures include leading entrepreneurs and executives, technology innovators, experts from the financial markets, and others who support the entrepreneurial infrastructure. Following these seminars, students will be able to meet the guest speakers along with other members of the entrepreneurial community.

    View Our Speaker Schedule

    Watch the ENTR 407 Videos

    Read the ENTR Blog


    191

Practicum

  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded

    The Practicum immerses students in the entrepreneurial process in a supportive classroom environment. Students critically evaluate and then pursue the development of their own ideas for new ventures. Throughout the course, students work closely with entrepreneurship faculty and successful entrepreneurs. The expected work volume of the practicum is estimated to be equivalent to 9-12 hours per week for a 14-week time-period.

    Note: Section 2 is focused on Engineering Technology. 

    222
  • Credits:
    3
    Prereq:
    Requires completion of ENTR 411
    Instructor(s):

    The Advanced Entrepreneurship Practicum is the second part of the entrepreneurship practicum experience led by the Center for Entrepreneurship. In this course, you will experience running, growing, and leading a sustainable venture by applying fundamental and practical skills of entrepreneurship.

    957

Core

  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    ARCH 326 or 416, or permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course is for emerging entrepreneurs in the design professions –- from architects and engineers to industrial designers -- who want to develop a design service and/or product idea through a simulated launch experience. Based in a creative workshop/seminar setting, students will individually complete and present weekly assignments and, in turn, collaboratively contribute to the evolving startups of fellow students. The weekly assignments will introduce the core essentials of design business entrepreneurship, including: design market research, positioning, branding, pitching, logo/identity design, legal/ownership modeling, finance and budgeting, strategic business planning, operational/space planning, brochure design, website design, proposal writing and interviewing. The final launch will be a mock interview before a distinguished guest panel of prospective “clients”. Each student will assemble their course assignments into a cumulative “Startup Portfolio”, which will serve as a useful reference and template for a future (real) venture. Evaluations will be based on both individual and collaborative efforts.

    193
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    In this project-based class, students will respond to pressing social needs through design thinking processes, including visioning, concept generation, sketching ideas, everyday ethnography, creative experimentation, and extensive prototyping and validation. Students will form interdisciplinary teams to work on actual entrepreneurial design projects focused on food, education, health care and income issues facing our community partners. As part of the course, students acquire the theoretical frameworks and skills necessary for undertaking a social enterprise. They will then use those tools to design and develop their own ideas for a social venture that creates possibilities, products and systems in response to real world problems.

    194
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Sr or Grad standing by permission
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    The design of artifacts is addressed from the multidisciplinary perspective that includes engineering, art, psychology, marketing, and economics. Using a decision-making framework, emphasis is places on understanding basic quantitative methods employed by the different disciplines for making design decisions, building mathematical models, and accounting for interdisciplinary interactions throughout the design and development process. Students work in teams to apply the methods on design project from concept generation to prototyping and design verification.

    195
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    ECON 401 (C- or better) or Graduate Standing

     This course provides students with the microeconomic analysis that a potential entrepreneur can use to analyze business opportunities. Students learn the different components of costs and revenues and their relevance for new business ventures and the determinants and measurement of consumer demand. Students also learn the various ways in which firms organize their transactions, and discuss when each is desirable.

    690
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Sr, EECS 281 & 380, 4 CS/CE elective credits
    Instructor(s):

    Best practices in the software engineering of mobile applications and best practices of software entrepreneurs in the design, production and marketing of mobile apps. Students will engage in the hands-on practice of entrepreneurship by actually inventing, building, and marketing their own mobile apps.

    196
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Senior or Graduate standing
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course provides students with a perspective in looking to form or join startup companies and those that are looking to create corporate value via industrial research. The students are taught the entrepreneurial business development screening tools necessary to translate opportunities into businesses with focus on: strategy, finance, and market positioning.

    190
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    ENGR 520, Senior standing or above
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course teaches the students how to screen venture opportunities in various cleantech domains. Venture assessments are approached through strategic, financial and market screens, and consider the impact of policy and regulatory constraints on the business opportunity. A midterm, final project, and six homework assignments are required.

    199
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Junior or above or permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    The goals of this course are to help students hone and enhance their problem solving, critical thinking, creative thinking, and troubleshooting skills and to ease the transition from college to the workplace. The course will invite outside speakers to address the class. Students work in teams to complete the home problems, interactive computer problems, and the term project.

    197
  • Credits:
    4
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):

    High-Tech Entrepreneurship --- Four aspects of starting high-tech companies are discussed: opportunity and strategy, creating new ventures, functional development and growth and financing. Also, student groups work on reviewing business books, case studies, elevator and investor pitches. Different financing models are covered, including angel or VC funding and small business (SBIR) funding.

    198
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):

    This course introduces students to business.  In this course we foster development of the key skill of learning via reflection on one's own experience.  The course will rely heavily on examination of individual organizations or industries from which generalizations can be made.  Specific situations will be selected to convey the excitement of business situations, the role of business in society and the global scope of business.  The primary purpose of this class is to educate students about the broad range of problems and opportunities that businesses face and the tools and skills that are necessary to face them.  A secondary purpose is to show the students the richness of business activity by 'peeling back the onion' via case discussions of situations and companies they have experienced in their lives.  Students will gain familiarity with different kinds of information resources: from trade magazines to mass market books to research journals.

    228
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Sophomore standing or above, Non BBA only
    Instructor(s):

    This business basics course covers how to make a product or service idea real in the form of a tangible, marketable product and an organization that can produce and distribute it. Topic areas covered include: motivation and social purpose of entrepreneurship, market research and product development activities, people resource management, capital resources management, and go-to-market management.

    882
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    ACC 301 and MKT 300
    Instructor(s):
    Entrepreneurial Management --- Entrepreneurship is about overcoming ambiguity, risk and failure, embracing it, and learning from it.  This course will explore entrepreneurship and identify and many contexts in which entrepreneurship manifests, including start-up, corporate, social, and public sector.  It will prepare students for starting and succeeding in an entrepreneurial venture.  The main course deliverable is a complete business plan and a presentation to an outside group of investors.

    This course will enable participants to sharpen their ability to find and evaluate opportunities for a new venture, as well as to think creatively and solve problems in highly unstructured situations.  A broad range of topics essential to entrepreneurial ventures will be covered, including idea generation, feasibility analysis, raising capital, marketing strategies, financial modeling, attracting a capable team, creating a culture, and preparing for growth.  In addition, the course will cover buying a business, franchising, and family business.

    611
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Jr or above BBA or permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course is a practicum, offering an opportunity to apply collective team work of a student/mentor alliance to building a launch pad for a technology-based venture. This course is open to Ross School MBA and BBA students as well as all UM graduate students. Student teams will work with mentors and principal investigators (PI) from UM faculty in the Medical School, College of Engineering and other divisions to build a business and marketing plan for a new technology or invention. Projects are based upon disclosures made to UM Office of Technology Transfer, other universities and industrial companies. Cross-listed with: Fin 329. This course is taught in the evening by David Brophy.

    200
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    MBA student or permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course is a practicum, offering an opportunity to apply collective team work of a student/mentor alliance to building a launch pad for a technology-based venture. This course is open to Ross School MBA and BBA students as well as all UM graduate students. Student teams will work with mentors and principal investigators (PI) from UM faculty in the Medical School, College of Engineering and other divisions to build a business and marketing plan for a new technology or invention. Projects are based upon disclosures made to UM Office of Technology Transfer, other universities and industrial companies.

    Cross-listed with: Fin 329.

    201
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Senior standing; priority given to IOE concentrators
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    IOE 422 is a course designed for seniors who want to learn what it means to be an entrepreneur, learn what is involved in starting new ventures, and understand and apply an entrepreneurial mindset to their personal and professional lives. Students will develop and present new business concepts, including market research, competitive analysis and risk assessment. Students will also work in teams to develop and present complete business models for a new venture, write a business plan, and develop detailed financial projections. The class is structured as a combination of lectures, discussion, and guest presentations by experienced entrepreneurs from a number of fields. Grades are based on individual and team assignments, class participation, and homework assignments.

    202
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Graduate standing or permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    The course helps to prepare students to start businesses in the information industry or to work effectively in new start-up businesses. It discusses all the aspects of creating a business and expects students to develop an idea into a business plan that could be used to either guide the creation of the business or secure funding for a new business. Non-profit organizations often require the same entrepreneurial skills as start-up businesses.

    203

Elective

  • Credits:
    4
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Junior standing or above
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course covers the fundaments of patents as intellectual property and is geared for undergraduate and graduate students whether in Engineering or any other field. Note that since students will be working in groups, it is not necessary that every student have a “ready-to-patent” idea. In addition, the course will cover the new America Invents Act – the first major overhaul of the U.S. patent system in 60 years.

    The first part of the course introduces intellectual property generally and patents specifically. It focuses on rules and techniques needed for investigating the background of an invention (“prior art”) and drafting a description of the invention (a “claim”).

    The second part of the course focuses on the strategies and methodology for drafting a patent specification and the rules for working with the U.S. Patent Office to obtain a patent. We will cover in summary form most parts of the Manual of Patent Examining Procedure (MPEP), with a special emphasis on Examination of Patents and Patentability of Applications.

    The third part of the course explores what happens after the Patent Office issues a patent. We will examine post-issuance review in the Patent Office and litigation techniques used to overturn patents. Finally, the ethics codes and licensing agreements are covered briefly.

    At the end of the course the students should be able to write a draft patent application for their invention, including the claims, which are the most important part of a patent. The best claims are those that fully cover the key aspects of the invention without impinging on prior art.

    204
  • Credits:
    2
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):

    This course will examine processes of design, focusing on the front-end of design, including opportunity discovery, problem definition, developing mechanisms to gather data from users and other stakeholders, translating user data into design requirements, creating innovative solutions during concept generation, and evaluating possible solutions. The strategies taught in the course are based on successful methods experts use to achieve design success, and are supplemented by readings on practice and research demonstrating their success. Coursework will focus on applications in various real-life design situations. This is a great way to prepare for your future design and entrepreneurship projects, capstone classes, and career!

    Note: Course registration requires permission of the instructor.  If you would like a place in this course please send a brief note to Dr. Shanna Daly (srdaly@umich.edu) specifying why you would like to be in the course

    205
  • Credits:
    1
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    The Intro to Social Entrepreneurship Course is designed as a gateway to the emerging field of social entrepreneurship. Social entrepreneurship practices innovative and sustainable solutions to transform, and in many instances, save human lives. Rather than assuming these needs can be met or answered by government or business sectors, social entrepreneurs find what is not working and solve the problem by changing the system, spreading the solution, and persuading others to take leaps in thinking and behavior. In this course, you will be provided with a broad conceptual framework to social entrepreneurship and be exposed to various local, national, and international social entrepreneurs to explore the skill sets necessary to effect change in a sustainable manner. We will draw heavily upon the practices and principles of design thinking, teaching you key skills of community engagement, visualization, ideation and prototype creation.

    206
  • Credits:
    1
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Sophomore standing or above
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    Inventors and entrepreneurs have four concerns related to patent law: protecting inventions during product development, determining invention patentability, avoiding infringement, and leveraging a patent as a business asset. This course addresses these concerns through the application of case law and business cases to an invention of a student's choice.

    207
  • Credits:
    1
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Sophomore standing or above
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course prepares students to identify and evaluate commercial opportunities for emerging technologies. Emphasis is on design and evaluation of business models and methods necessary for rapid, rigorous analysis of these models. Students will develop preliminary business models and evaluate possible commercial opportunities.

    208
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):

    Today, most new entrepreneurs are ill-equipped to make strategic decisions on the ownership structure of their organizations. To address this need, the CFE is launching the course “Entrepreneurial Ownership.” This course is designed to provide an analytical framework to improve entrepreneurs’ understanding of individual and shared ownership models in their organizations. It will also enhance entrepreneurial skills and capabilities, improve the understanding of the way alternative ownership decisions affect organizational dynamics, and take an in depth look at specific mechanisms that entrepreneurs can use to create positive ownership outcomes.

    209
  • Credits:
    1
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Concurrent enrollment in ENTR 407
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This class is a complimentary, graded discussion group to ENTR 407. In this one-credit course, students will learn about, discuss and debate the key characteristics of entrepreneurship and learn how to apply it to their own life goals. A brief weekly assignment is required.

    210
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):
    It’s hard to start a company, but doesn't have to be complicated. This course dramatically improves your odds of starting a viable business by providing a 
    framework for identifying large, attractive opportunities. Every student will leave with a viable business opportunity to pursue and a set of valuable and repeatable skills that will be an asset in any entrepreneurial setting.
    960
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Sophomore standing or above
    Instructor(s):

    This course presents a pragmatic approach to marketing for new ventures. The course examines general marketing terms and principles, including the nature, dynamics, and strategies of marketing decision for new ventures. Students will apply these concepts to situations and problems relating to real ventures.

    970
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None

    This short course guides students through the basics of design prototyping and concept visualization. It is intended for students who do not typically engage in hands-on making as part of their major area of study. Topics covered include using accessible materials like paper, chipboard, foam core, and found objects to build models that are tangible representations of concepts for new designs. Simple drawing techniques for visualizing and communicating ideas under development will also be demonstrated. Students will learn a variety of prototyping approaches and techniques ranging from the quick and dirty (useful for the brainstorming stage) to more precise and sophisticated (best for final design presentation). The course focuses on building models of existing design concepts rather than on developing new concepts.

    961
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None

    This short course introduces students to basic woodworking tools and techniques. It is intended for students who do not typically engage in hands-on making as part of their major area of study. Students will learn to build objects with wood and gain the basic skills needed to be able to complete simple wood fabrication projects with confidence. This course will compliment studies in other fields, provide technical support and resources, and encourage continued development beyond the classroom. Tools and materials will be provided.

    962
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    This short course introduces students to basic metal fabrication tools and techniques. It is intended for students who do not typically engage in hands-on making as part of their major area of study. Students will learn to build objects with metal and gain the basic skills needed to be able to complete simple metal fabrication projects with confidence. This course will compliment studies in other fields, provide technical support and resources, and encourage continued development beyond the classroom. Tools and materials will be provided.
     
    963
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Graduate standing
    Instructor(s):

    In this course, students will learn how to become an active participant in and a leader of the scalable innovation process. Students will train in a new way of thinking (systems thinking), where the focus shifts from evaluating problems and developing possible solutions in the traditional, localized mode of "creativity" to the more global, scalable mode of innovation, business creation and engineering design. This training will consist of readings, lectures, and exercises in systems analysis, divergent and convergent thinking, thinking in exponential scales, and using these approaches for more effective problem identification, problem evaluation, and problem solving, all of which form the foundation for effective entrepreneurship.

    213
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Graduate Standing
    Instructor(s):

    Students will learn how to allocate ownership within a founding team and plan for future growth, learn the necessary skills to become effective entrepreneurial managers, and recognize various entrepreneurial strategies and when each is appropriate.

    972
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Graduate Standing

    Students will learn about the social consequences of their technical choices, reconciling conflicting obligations to different stakeholders, and the practical ethics of implementation and management.

    973
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    MsE students only
    Instructor(s):
    975
  • Credits:
    1.5
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Strategy 502/601
    Instructor(s):

    New entrepreneurial ventures, once successfully past the formation stage, often encounter problems caused by their very rapid growth. Different functional and technical skills are needed. More reliable information is a must. External support groups (bankers, attorneys, accountants, and investors) and new company employees both have to be integrated into the goals and operations of the firm. The activities of the entrepreneur have to change, from innovation to delegation, communication, and organization. This is a very basic change that many entrepreneurs never make. The purpose of the course is to convey in a very pragmatic fashion the reason, the areas, the tools, and the urgency of that critical leadership change.

    215
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Jr or Sr BBA, or permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course is open to all BBA students and presents the fundamentals of venture capital and private equity finance. It is focused on financing startup and early stage, technology-based firms, later stage investment and buyouts. The course covers venture capital and private equity market structure and institutional arrangements and the application of financial theory and methods in a venture capital and private equity setting. Four men aspects of venture capital and private equity are covered: valuation, deal structuring, governance, and harvesting. "Live" case studies are used to demonstrate the practical, hands-on application of techniques following their development in class.

    216
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Jr or Sr BBA or permission of instructor
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course is designed focus on the new product development process which is key to the success of any organization. The course will expose students to (a) creative techniques for idea generation, (b) fine-tuning these ideas to develop products and services that meet specific consumer needs, and (c) testing the feasibility of these ideas. The course uses lectures, cases, and outside speakers. Moreover, the course includes a project wherein student teams need to use the creativity techniques covered in this class to come up with new product ideas and perform a concept test to evaluate their feasibility. The course will be useful to students interested in product/brand management, management consulting, and entrepreneurship.

    217
  • Credits:
    2.25
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    MKT 501 or 503; or permission of instructor (priority given to MBA students)
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    Innovation and development of new products and services are essential for the success of any organization. At the same time, the same time, designing and launching new products is risky. Managing the new product development therefore involves identifying new product ideas that have great potential and lowering the risk of their failure. This course discusses the stages in the new product development process and avenues for making the process more productive. Specific topics covered include creative techniques for idea generation, designing new products and services using analytical techniques, sales forecasting, testing, and tactics and strategies for new product launch. The course uses lectures, cases, and outside speakers. Moreover, the course includes a project wherein student teams will use the creativity techniques covered in this class to come up with new product ideas and perform a concept test in order to evaluate their feasibility. The course has a quantitative focus and delves on issues that are very relevant to managers on a day to day basis. The course will be especially useful for those interested in product/brand management, management consulting, and entrepreneurship.

    218
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    PSYCH 111, 112, 114 or 115
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    Entrepreneurship, to many people, is difficult to define and can represent a mysterious outcome by which new businesses are started. Entrepreneurship, though, not only involves the creation of new firms, but it can also occur within existing organizations-whether in the pursuit of profit or other social goals. Further, regardless of where entrepreneurship occurs, the process not only involves enterprising individuals, but also the availability of opportunities, which can be created, discovered, and exploited. A person could be creative and enterprising but this does not guarantee the creation or discovery of opportunities. In this course a major focus will thus be on the concept and study of opportunities, which we will pursue by considering the social context in which they are embedded and the psychological and behavioral processes that influence their creation, recognition, evaluation, and exploitation. The course material will be based on scholarly articles and cases on entrepreneurship and related subjects, and the class format will involve group presentations, lecture, class exercises, and active discussion in a seminar format.

    219
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    SI 501 or permission of instructor
    Syllabus:

    Covers the key concepts of evaluation and a variety of methods used to determine the goals of a system or service, performs organizational analysis, assesses task/technology or service fit, determines ease of learning of new or existing services or systems, determines ease of use, assesses aspects of performance (including information retrieval), and evaluates the success in accomplishing the user/organizational goals. Methods include observation, survey, interviews, performance analysis, evaluation in the design/iteration cycle, usability tests, and assessment of systems in use.

    220
  • Credits:
    4
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Undergraduates only
    Syllabus:

    This is a class where students are encouraged, in an interdisciplinary way, to explore their own creativity. Faculty with training in Architecture, Visual Arts, Music and Engineering will teach students their own approaches to creativity within their fields, and encourage students to find their own approaches (in and out of their current stated disciplines). Students will be expected and encouraged to explore creativity without thinking about disciplinary boundaries. Students will have short 2-week “workshops” with each faculty member, as well as work on a Final Project, either on their own, or in an interdisciplinary team of their own creation.

    This course is team taught. Course coordinator: Stephen Rush. Professors: Gregory Saldana, Michael Gould, Elona Van Gent, Herbert Winful.

    221
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Sophomore standing and above
    Instructor(s):

    This course explores the relation between creativity, innovation, and problem-solving processes. We will consider the elements of creative thinking, explore insights from a variety of perspectives, and engage in projects designed to foster students’ own creativity and innovation.

    Topics:
    -How do innovators frame problems and generate solutions?
    -What is the relation between idea generation and collaborative team work?
    - How do entrepreneurs in business, social goods, and technology develop and employ vital skills in persuasion, cooperation, communication as they bring ideas to life in the form of enterprises?

    969

Course of Interest

  • Credits:
    2.25
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    Business Strategies for the Base of the Pyramid (BA612) explores the alignment between the development communities’ growing interest in identifying new poverty alleviation perspectives and efforts to expand the role of market-based ventures in serving the needs of the poor. The goal of the course is to provide you with practical concepts, tools, and frameworks for developing and evaluating business approaches that address unmet societal needs of the base of the pyramid (BoP), the four billion low-income people who live in the informal sector in the developing world. Using a carefully crafted set of case studies, simulations, videos, and readings, we will apply these ideas to assess the efforts of companies, non-profits, and development agencies implementing BoP ventures in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.To help students gain a first-hand understanding of on-going work in the field, the course also includes two 3-hour lab sessions focused on interaction and shared learning.

    224
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    Imagine and create innovative mobile technologies to enhance mindfulness through the day. Mindfulness is defined as being able to bring harmony between knowledge (resources) and action and is now becoming one of the most important ingredients in wellness.

    Students taking this course will create “GPS-like” technology to help the user map out and stay on the desired path to wellness.

    226
  • Credits:
    1
    Grading:
    Pass/Fail
    Prereq:
    None

    In this workshop, students will learn a theoretical framework for education entrepreneurship, as well as explore the individual skills and will necessary to respond to complex social needs both inside and outside the classroom. Students will be placed on teams throughout the mini-course to engage in hands-on activities, case studies, competitions, and a final presentation. The objective of this course is to inspire and begin equipping students to become innovative leaders in education:

    • Understand yourself as a leader within the context of a classroom/community and how to lead with moral imagination (the ability to put yourself in the shoes of the people you are serving).
    • Understand how an entrepreneurial mindset & operational skills can create and support social change.
    • Turn theory into action by designing an entrepreneurial solution to an educational problem.
    227
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    None
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course is designed to introduce the student to the practices necessary to stimulate and manage creativity in a business. Students will be given frameworks and methods for designing, developing, and implementing creativity in real work situations. The aim of the course is to provide students with the perspective and skill base necessary to manage creative projects, people, and ventures. Each class will consist of two basic components:

    1. A theatrical framework, and
    2. A methodology or tool.

    Each segment of the course is designed to engage the student in a conceptual and experiential application of creativity practices that will be applied to a real challenge.

    229
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    PSYCH 111, 112, 114 or 115
    Instructor(s):
    Syllabus:

    This course is about innovators and entrepreneurs. Are they different from the rest of us? Do they think and act in distinctive ways? Innovators and entrepreneurs are people who put their new ideas to use in the world. Their dream may be to create a new business, help a disadvantaged group or save the environment, but beneath the surface they share a common set of strategies. We will learn how they frame problems, marshal persuasive tactics and manage cooperation as they turn their vision into a new enterprise. Students will reach a more complete understanding by actually doing some of the things that entrepreneurs and innovators do.

    Seminar participants will have a chance to interview innovators and entrepreneurs, work in teams, and make brief presentations of their own entrepreneurial project ideas. Seminar participants will be responsible for specific readings and a final paper based on their own project.

    231
  • Credits:
    3
    Grading:
    Graded
    Prereq:
    Informatics concentrators
    Syllabus:

    Any product--whether a website, a technological system, or an electronically mediated service--benefits from evaluation before, during, and after the development cycle. Too often, the people who use a product cannot find what they want or accomplish what they need to do. Products are more successful when they are developed through a process that identifies how the products will be used, elicits input from potential users, and watches how the product function in real time with real users. This course provides a hands--on introduction to methods used throughout the entire evaluation process--from identifying the goals of the product, picturing who will use it, engaging users through a variety of formative evaluation techniques, and confirming a product's function through usability testing and summative evaluation. Specific methods include personas and scenarios, competitive analysis, observation, surveys, interviews, data analysis, heuristic evaluation, usability testing, and task analysis. Students will work on group projects that apply these techniques to real products in use or development.

    232